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I also enjoy making many of my own handtools. There is something very satisfying about crafting furniture with tools that were also made by my hands. 

In the future I hope to include progress photos of current work and some brief how to pictorials on different aspects of creating furniture that will age gracefully and be cherished through the generations.

Long bed lathe- I grew tired of the limitations of my first lathe so I built a lathe with a 16" swing that can turn pieces up to 8 feet long.
I made the infill smooth plane to tame the unruly grain on a desk I was building. The desk can be seen in the portfolio section. Standard planes cannot easily handle highly figured lumber. This infill plane incorporates features that render these beautiful woods glass smooth.
This is my first infill plane that I made. It may not be the prettiest plane ever made but it is without a doubt my favorite. It fits perfectly in my hands and leaves  in its wake wood that is perfectly smooth and lustrous. No amount of sanding can match the surface left by a finely tuned handplane.
A few marking and mortisng gauges. These are used to scribe a line parallel to the edge of a board.
Chisels and floats
Trammel points
Backsaws, spokeshave, travisher and foreplane
A few backsaws that I have made from scratch. These are a joy to use. They have minimal set so you cannot make corrections but if you start straight they will track straight and cut  true to the line.
Inlay tools- grooving tool, slicing gauge, small router and radius grooving tool.
Group photo of some of my favorites.
A few sliding t-bevels. I made a small run of these to sell and for my own use. The three on the right are ready to transfer some angles.
I am going to start making these for sale. They are a lot of fun to make and they work better than any other saws that I have used.
Preparing to flatten and thickness lumber. I have some large machine at my disposal such as a 16" jointer and 20 " planer, unfortuantely these slabs are larger than my machines can handle so I have to tackle them using a different approach. I will never cut boards down to fit my machines.
Using a router on a sled and rail system to joint and thickness the slabs. It takes considerably more work to do it this way but using this method I can handle most any timber without resorting to shortcuts.
It took rougly 12 hours and 4 wheel barrows full of shavings but I have the slabs ready for final sanding. My normal approach would be to use hand planes to do the majority of the work but these slabs were highly figured and planes tend to tear out the grain on figured lumber.
Debarking the edges. I use "wooden chisels" to remove the bulk of the bark and various abrasives to clean up the edges without changing the natural form.
The base shown before glue-up. I use traditional joinery such as mortise and tenon for frame components and various style of dovetails for case joinery.
Final assembly of the table in my shop prior to delivery.
Process shots taken while building a walnut slab table